Category Archives: Free Programs

A BLOCKBUSTER ARTS IN THE PARK EVENT West Park Arts Fest / FREE / Rain or Shine / 1:00pm – 6:00pm

By Niesha Kennedy

The 12th Annual West Park Arts Fest presented by West Park Cultural Center, Fairmount Park Conservancy and Mural Arts Philadelphia will feature more than two dozen performances on two
stages. On June 8th West Fairmount Park on South Concourse Drive will come alive with everything from funk, jazz, R&B, modern dance, hip hop, Zumba, line dancing, art-making, live superheroes,
book giveaways, an art/craft marketplace, to food vendors and so much more.

With a Call to Action, Spiral Q. puppets, and the award-winning West Powelton Drum Squad will start in the community and proceed along Parkside Avenue to South Concourse Drive near 42nd and Parkside where the official start of the West Park
Arts Fest will begin at 1:00 pm. During the event, attendees can participate in the Spiral Q puppet workshop and join a mini procession through the festival. The event will engage the young and the seasoned in dance, art making, and other activities, including our popular narrated historical trolley tours through the Centennial District at 1 pm and 2 pm.

The Music Stage will feature Philadelphia’s first ‘FunkFest at the West Park Arts Fest’ showcasing an impressive lineup of bands from Philly’s growing Funk scene, and headlined by none other than
Philadelphia’s own “Breakwater”.

“Breakwater is excited to be headlining the first annual FunkFest. Come Splashdown with us as we lay down the funk at [West Park Arts Fest!]” – Steve Green, Breakwater Band Member. “Funk is an
important part of the sound of Philadelphia that deserves to be celebrated.”

FunkFest will include a dynamic range of funkinspired music from Jazz-Funk and Fusion, to Rock and Soul. This years’ lineup includes PhunkyMan, Expansion Project, My Funky Brethren, Terretta
Storm, The Original Groove Circus, Paulette Branson & Mixed People, and Badd Kitti. Badd Kitti (aka Dianne Brieze Thompson) is also the funkfest curator and host. Performances begin at 1 pm and
continue to 6 pm ending with an hour of Breakwater. A large crowd is expected, so come early and bring your lawn chairs.

We are pleased to announce that Park West Town Center has joined this year as one of the Arts Fest sponsors and thrilled they are bringing the very popular pony rides. Jim Burnett of WPFSI will
announce the WesGold Fellows scholarship recipients. From the music stage. Sponsors also include ARTPLACE, BlackRock, Haverford Square Properties, UPS, Brown’s Parkside ShopRite,
Rockland Capital, Zakian, Zerflin, and support from the Philadelphia Cultural Fund.

Attendees of all ages will enjoy culturally diverse performances by some of the area’s most talented dancers, musicians, and vocalists. Activities for children and adults alike include the Black Sci-Fi
Comic Book Corner, roaming live Black Super Heroes and Tree House Books will have their book giveaway. Stop by the Global Philadelphia Heritage Booth and share your story in the Heritage
Storytelling Seat, then color World Heritage postcards to mail to friends and families.

Participate in Japanese fan making and origami, and children will enjoy playing with various robotic toys that teach the principles of basic robotics from The Franklin Institute.

Performances on the dance stage include Swing Two, Sound Stage Performing Arts students, Penn Chinese Dance Club, Three Aksha sponsored by The Mann Center, dancer Julian Darden sponsored by the African American Museum of Philadelphia, Little Big Sister Band, and more. The West Philadelphia Senior Community Center will lead an interactive social dance and line dance activity, and Crystal Evans will lead attendees in Zumba. As seen in local
and national media, our West Park Cultural Center danceLogic girls will perform their own choreography.

The festival’s mission is to bring communities together in the park, promote greater awareness of the area’s history and heritage while celebrating the arts and cultural diversity of Philadelphia. The
festival is made possible in significant part to the participation of many arts, cultural, and community partners including The Franklin Institute, Mann Center, Please Touch Museum, The Philadelphia
Zoo, Shofuso Japanese Cultural Center, and many others.

Festival Hours: Saturday, June 8th, 2019 from
1:00pm to 6:00 pm
Rain or Shine

For more information about the West Park Arts Fest
visit westparkcultural.org/west-park-arts-fest or call
(215) 473-7810.

Follow West Park Arts Fest on:

http://www.facebook.com/westparkartsfestival

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A Season for Giving by Jasmine Bullock

The holiday season is always an exciting time of year. Families and friends often fellowship and exchange gifts. It is also a time for giving and the West Philadelphia area is abundant with opportunities to give to people in need, of all ages. Community Coordinator, Pamela Evans has made it her mission to provide opportunities for students and families in need. Ms. Evans spent fifteen years serving the students and families of Discovery Charter School. Within the last year, she transitioned to Alain Locke Elementary, a Community School in West Philadelphia, where she has instituted several programs to service the families throughout the area.

The Locke school and Pam Evans have initiated a “Community Closet.” This space is open for donation of clothing and hygiene supplies for people of all ages. The donations of clothing, toys, baby supplies, and bath supplies are open to all but specifically those who reside in the West Park High Rise apartments and shelters. The Locke School is continuously open taking in tax deductible donations. They are especially in need of donations of diapers children’s clothing, and clothing adults can wear for job interviews. They are also looking for school uniforms and sweat pants to help discourage student absences due to lack of appropriate clothing.

This particular community closet is special because of the personal attention “shoppers” get when looking for items. The school has acquired a volunteer to work as a shopping attendant. This individual not only sorts and maintains the items donated to the closet, he also works with individuals to choose items to best fit their needs. The personal attention allows those in need to feel special and guarantees that they receive the right items.

Throughout the Thanksgiving holiday season, Ms. Evans has several missions planned. With the help of local organizations and businesses such as Westside Church and the People’s Emergency Center, Ms. Evans was able to organize the donation of approximately 45 Turkeys to families for their Thanksgiving feasts. Ms. Evans is proud that Lavish Restaurant at 4308 Lancaster Avenue will provide dinner on Thanksgiving for 300 people free of charge.

Ms. Evans also arranged for three students at the Locke School to have a dinner at Lavish Restaurant with their families. The students will be chosen through raffle based on their attendance and timeless to school throughout the month of November.

Another initiative that is thriving is the Gifts of Warmth Drive. This project looks to collect socks, hats, gloves and scarves for children in the area. Ms. Evans has partnered with local hair salons and barber shops on Lancaster Avenue to host donation boxes for their clients and members of the community to drop off donations.

The Gifts of Warmth initiative goes beyond the doors of the Locke School. Each year, the Please Touch museum collects coats for children in need. They send all of their donations to the Second Antioch Baptist Church. Rev. Dr. Joe Nock and his leadership team distribute the gifts of coats to not only members of the church who are in need but also to community members throughout Parkside. While winter is often thought of as a season for giving, donations to many of these initiatives can be given throughout the year. Sweater, scarf, hat, glove and sock donations can be left at the Please Touch Museum from November 24th through December 8th. All donations to the Locke School for the Community Closet can left in the main office of Alain Locke School, 4550 Haverford Avenue, from 8am to 3pm weekdays.

Remember, the holiday season is a time for fun and family but also a time to think about giving to families.

Food Cupboards in the Parkside Area

PEC
325 North 39th Street
267-777-5477
Saturdays; 10:30am – 1:30pm

Church of New Hope and Faith
662 N. 39th Street
215-222-7672
Monday, Wednesday, Friday; 9:30am – 3:30pm

Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral
19 South 19th Street
215-386-0234
Mondays; 10am until 150 households are served

Grace Lutheran Church
3529 Haverford Avenue
215-222-3570

Mt. Zion United Holy Church
4110 Haverford Avenue
215-349-6734
West Philadelphia Seventh Day Adventist Church
4527 Haverford Avenue
215-222-5707

June Rocked with the 11th Annual West Park Arts Fest

by Niesha Kennedy

What a beautiful day with more than 20 arts, cultural, and community partners contributing to provide a fun day for over 2,300 attendees of all ages in West Fairmount Park. This annual free public event created by West Park Cultural Center (WPCC) in 2008, moved into the park two years ago with Fairmount Park Conservancy joining WPCC as a presenter. This year Mural Arts Philadelphia also came on board.

The West Park Arts Fest brings communities together in the park and promotes greater awareness of the area’s history and heritage, all while celebrating the arts and cultural diversity of Philadelphia. On June 9, 2018, the 11th West Park Arts Fest took place on South Concourse Drive adjacent to the Centennial Commons along Parkside Avenue. Centennial Commons, a “new park within a park” is the project of Fairmount Park Conservancy as part of Philadelphia’s Reimagining the Civic Commons initiative.

There was something for everyone!

Live music performances by the West Philadelphia Orchestra, always a crowd favorite. Patrice and The Show gave us some R&B flavor and got the crowd to their feet, dancing and singing along. West Park Arts Fest veteran performers, Badd Kitti and Gretchen Elise Music rocked the stage with their upbeat performances. And that was just the music stage.

At the other end of the festival attendees enjoyed performances on the dance stage by Sam Watson, who performed the history of dance, starting with jazz and culminating with recent hip hop. The Philly Clicks tap-danced their way around the stage keeping the crowd excited. Penn Chinese Dance Club is always a visually appealing, cultural performance. The teen girls of West Park Cultural Center’s dancelogic program, performed after completing Saturday classes that combined dance and coding. Festival-goers shopped the Handmade Marketplace with artwork, handcraftedjewelry, clothing, ceramics, children’s books, pet gear and much more. Food vendors were a hit, from Korean Fried Chicken with Slurp Philly to water ice, pretzels and ice cream to keep cool with Cold Pink Treats.

Activities for kids of all ages, young and old included art making, robots from the Franklin Institute, storytelling, face painting, make and takes, interactives with the Shofuso Japanese House and Garden, Philadelphia Zoo and many more. Attendees hopped aboard and enjoyed the West Park Arts Fest, free narrated trolley tours of the Fairmount Park Centennial District. Kathy Lee and Ed Miller of the Fairmount Park Conservancy shared the history of the area going back to the World’s Fair in 1876 as well as information about the cultural and natural resources that are currently available in West Fairmount Park.

 

West Park Arts Fest – Saturday June 9th, 2018

Founded by West Park Cultural Center in 2008, the West Park Arts Fest is moving to South Concourse Drive in West Fairmount Park. The site is adjacent to the Centennial Commons project along Parkside Avenue- an exciting public space project by Fairmount Park Conservancy as part of Philadelphia’s Reimagining the Civic Commons initiative.

Fairmount Park Conservancy and Mural Arts Philadelphia are joining West Park Cultural Center as organizers for this free public event advancing the festival’s mission to bring communities together in the park, promote greater awareness of the area’s history and heritage, while celebrating the arts and cultural diversity of Philadelphia. The festival embraces partnership and has over the years been made possible in great part to the participation of many arts, cultural and community partners from West Philadelphia and across Philadelphia.

On Saturday June 9th from 12pm to 5pm attendees of all ages will enjoy stages of exciting culturally diverse performances by some of the area’s best dancers, musicians, vocalists, and spoken word artists. Some of the talent includes the popular West Philadelphia Orchestra, Badd Kitti, Gretchen Elise Music, Lauren Putty White, The Philly Clicks, Jasmin Yahne Dance Company, and many more. The event will engage attendees in dance, art making, and many other activities including guided historical trolley tours through the Centennial District. The Franklin Institute will showcase prototypes of its new exhibition “Game Masters” as well as providing PACTS program activities. Attendees can buy unique items in the Handmade Market, browse other vendors and enjoy refreshments from diverse food vendors. An estimated 3,000 are expected to attend. There are Sponsor and Vendor opportunities.

Fairmount Park Conservancy’s Arts & Culture Program, with the support of ArtPlace America, will commission one artist or artist team to create an outdoor art installation for Arts Fest with interactive elements that draw their inspiration from the neighborhood. Festival goers will also see a standing timeline created by Global Philadelphia that documents Parkside’s history and heritage with pictures and text.

To see more visit http://www.westparkcultural.org /westparkartsfest or call 215-473-7810

Niesha Kennedy, PR Manager West Park Cultural nkennedy@westparkcultural.org

11th. Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival

Philadelphia’s Jaleel Shaw to Headline Free, Family-Friendly Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival

Event Celebrates 11th Anniversary with the New Wave of Jazz on July 15th

Philadelphia, PA – Saxophonist Jaleel Shaw will headline the 11th Annual Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival on Saturday, July 15th from noon to 7pm in Penn Presbyterian Medical Center’s Saunders Park Greene, 39th and Powelton Avenue. Hosted by People’s Emergency Center (PEC), this marks the 11th year that this annual event has taken place, which has grown from a few hundred attendees to more than 3,000. This year the FREE Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival offers a family-friendly event showcasing the best of Philadelphia: a mix of up and coming young artists who are shaping the future of jazz, a diverse gathering of people, a view of the city and a chance to enjoy a neighborhood that is rich in arts and culture. Rain date is Sunday, July 16.

Artisans and vendors along with a variety of specialty food trucks will be on site. Activities such as a moon bounce, face painting, community resources and digital pop-up computer lab will be available for everyone’s enjoyment. Free parking is available one block away at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center’s lot at Powelton Avenue and State Street.

Also performing on the Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival stage are jazz performers Matthew Clayton on sax, the vocalist V.Shayne Fredrick, Josh Lawrence on trumpet, the vocalist Lee Mo, Nazir Ebo on drums, and Phoenix Mystique! The Universal African Dance and Drum Ensemble will also be back by popular demand, courtesy of The Mann Center for the Performing Arts.

“We are excited to present the 11th Lancaster Avenue Jazz Festival by ushering in the New Wave of Jazz. These under-40 performers will offer the audience very best in fusion, rhythm, and smooth jazz musicianship. The Festival is gaining in renown and popularity, as is Lancaster Avenue. The corridor’s rich artistic and cultural history is leading to a bright future for businesses and residents,” says PEC President Kathy Desmond.

Sponsors include Duane Morris, United Healthcare, The Mann Center for the Performing Arts, Drexel University, Ellen Brotman Law, Citizens Bank, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, and Ember IT. Talent for the Lancaster Avenue Jazz Fest is curated by the Producer’s Guild of Philadelphia.

A Community Dedicated to Arts and Culture

The community that organizes and supports the Lancaster Avenue Jazz Festival is dedicated to increasing the profile of arts and culture institutions in West Philadelphia. PEC and the Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival committee will honor James Dupree and J. Michael Harrison for their outstanding contributions to advancing arts and culture for youth, this community, and the world. The Producer’s Guild of Philadelphia will also grant Lifetime Achievement awards to some musicians.

Master Class

The Community Education Center will host the Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival 4th Annual Masters class. This provides an opportunity for youth to participate in practice sessions under the direction of a seasoned Master musician. This year we are honored to have Brent White join us as the curator of the classes. He will instruct the students in the original music of PEC’s headliner Jaleel Shaw supervise practice sessions and lead the students in a special performance on Friday, July 14 at the Community Education Center.

More about the Lancaster avenue Jazz and Arts Festival

The goals of the Festival include: celebrating jazz performers under the age of 40, increasing awareness of the Lancaster Avenue commercial corridor, stimulating the local economy, energizing the community, bringing together partners, and highlighting the community’s rich cultural arts and educational assets. For more information, go to  www.lancasteravejazzfest.com and facebook..com/lancasteravejazzfest.

About People’s Emergency Center

           The People’s Emergency Center’s mission is to nurture families, strengthen neighborhoods and drive change in West Philadelphia. PEC offers affordable housing, job training, parenting and early childhood education, financial education and planning, life skills and technology coursework. PEC seeks to change the life trajectory for the women and children who seek its services and inspire them to aspire to new heights. The PEC community development corporation programs respond to community needs and build on neighborhood assets to help bridge the digital divide, expand mixed-income housing opportunities, stimulate economic growth, create wealth, and improve the quality of life for all West Philadelphia residents. http://www.pec-cares.org www.lancasteravephilly.com www.pechousing.com  # # #

Contact: Trish Downey, PEC Cell: (267) 334-5778  Office: (267) 777-5811 tdowney@pec-cares.org

 

 

REMEMBERING A LEGEND – 2017 Jackie Robinson Day Celebration in Memorial Park

by Nikia Brown

“He could hit and bunt and steal and run. He had intimidating skills, and he burned with a dark fire.” -Roger Kahn, The Boys of Summer

On April 15, 2017, Parkside community residents and civic leaders gathered around the Philadelphia Stars Negro League Memorial Park to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s debut as the first African American to enter Major League Baseball (MLB). Robinson broke the color barrier in MLB when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947. Nevertheless, his legacy far surpasses that of a typical athlete. He is an iconic legend, Civil Rights ambassador, record breaker, and a man he lived by his own ethos: “A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

The Memorial Park Celebration attracted a diverse audience including Gwen Gould, the last surviving wife of one of the Philadelphia Stars players, Harold Gould; Kenny Johnson, Coordinator of Community Engagement for the Philadelphia Phillies; Ron Whittington, a Jackie Robinson storyteller and impersonator; and, of course, the eagerly anticipated and wildly unpredictable, Phillie Phanatic.

Gould, who is now in her late 80s, expressed feelings of deep satisfaction and pride after the day’s event. “It was wonderful. I saw a lot of little kids out here which is encouraging. It’s a wonderful thing, and at my age you appreciate just getting out and being among friends.” Philadelphia Phillies Community Engagement Coordinator, Kenny Johnson, grew up in West Philadelphia right around the corner from the Philadelphia Stars Memorial Park. He feels a connection to the community and is grateful for the positive impact of Negro League baseball on urban neighborhoods.

“This event is important because baseball is an intergenerational sport. It’s grandmothers and grandfathers passing it down to their kids,” says Johnson. “Stories of Jackie Robinson and his exemplary legacy are very important (and must) stay within the consciousness of families and the community. It shows that when you persevere, when you work hard and bring folks together, you can do some amazing things.”

Two Phillies Ball Girls accompanied Johnson to the Celebration, Courtney Williams and Trisha Lang. This was Williams’ second year coming to the event and she expressed that it is important “to look back at our history to see the movers and shakers and how we got to be where we are today.” Williams, who is African American, feels her race provides a greater impetus to survey the events of Black history and how much the African American community has progressed since oppressive times. “It’s sometimes hard to see how far we’ve come, but we really have come very far,” says Williams.

While this was Lang’s first time attending the event, she was equally grateful to be a part of the experience. She stated, “I am thankful to be able to be in this position where I can come out and be involved in such a great event that involves the entire community and brings everyone together to look back at how far we’ve come and where we started.”

The event was also well-represented by key members of the Business Association of West Parkside such as Marjorie Ogilvie, Miller Parker, Lucinda Hudson, Cassandra Hayes, and Dennis Lee.

Parker, who has been the treasurer of the Business Association of West Parkside for about 15 years, remembers with fondness the early beginnings of the Philadelphia Stars Negro League Memorial Park. He shares, “One of the things we want to do is draw attention to this neighborhood and community and get the community involved in the park. We came up with this idea that baseball might be the way to go because there was a baseball field here a number of years ago where the Negro League played.” Parker believes this annual celebration is one way of keeping the legacy of extraordinary African Americans alive in the community.

Hayes, an animated and dedicated community advocate, continued, “This is something that we have been doing for the past eleven years. I’ve been a part of it every year. I come, I eat, I play, I meet folks. It’s a great way to just enjoy the community and recognize one of the historical figures in Black and American history.” Lee, who emceed the event, felt this year’s festivities was special because it marked their 11th year of hosting the Memorial Celebration and Jackie Robinson’s 70th year of remembrance. “The future is promising if we remember our legacy,” offered Lee before jetting off to his next event. The team is already expectant of next year’s activities and look forward to sharing the rich history of the Philadelphia Stars with a broader and more diversified audience.

 

Celebrating 10 Years of Community Heritage by Nikia Brown

Summer is quickly approaching and with it comes the annual call for spring celebrations. Deep green leaves will visit again the tall trees that line Parkside Avenue. The rush of children running from one summer program to the next will once again fill the streets. Neighborhood businesses will soon ready their shelves with refreshing items, while cultural organizations prepare new experiences for frequent visitors and tourists alike. As the season changes, the air is filled with expectations of warm weather and residents look forward to the plethora of community offerings that await them. On June 3, Parkside will welcome the summer with two community-wide festivals that draw hundreds of residents to their corridors on an annual basis: The West Park Arts Fest and Festival @ ParkWest Town Center.

This year, the West Park Arts Fest and Festival @ ParkWest Town Center share the same 10-year anniversary, and will be joining efforts to maximize the experience for festival-goers. Guided historic trolleys beginning and ending at the West Park Arts Fest will connect both festivals to ensure that visitors have the opportunity to experience both events. Festival goers will also benefit from a scenic tour through Fairmount Park’s Centennial District.

The West Park Arts Fest was created by the West Park Cultural Center in 2008 as a vehicle to promote cultural diversity, celebrate the arts, and bring people together across neighborhoods. “Many of our festival goers have expressed how much they like the family atmosphere and cultural diversity,” says Betty Lindley, Executive Director of the West Park Cultural Center. Lindley champions the efforts of the diverse partners that contribute to the success of the program each year. “The festival embraced partnership and has over the years been made possible in great part to the participation of many arts, cultural, and community partners.”

Lindley is excited about the Center’s new collaboration with the Fairmount Park Conservancy and Global Philadelphia Association. “This represents a major milestone for the West Park Arts Fest and builds on the original mission,” prides Lindley. “Through this joint effort we are taking the West Park Arts Fest to the next level with increased participation and greater awareness of West Fairmount Park and surrounding communities,” she adds.

The Fairmount Park Conservancy is equally grateful for the partnership as they feel this opportunity is directly aligned with their mission “to bring positive, family friendly activities to park spaces.” Jennifer Mahar, Senior Director of Civic Initiatives, feels the collaboration is timely with the festival moving from its usual venue, School of the Future, to West Fairmount Park. “The shift requires a whole new set of logistics,” says Mahar. “Our Special Events Coordinator has years of experience in organizing large-scale outdoor events and we were more than happy to help!”

The Global Philadelphia Association was born shortly after the West Park Arts Fest and has since grown tremendously in size and form. Since November 2015, the Association, in partnership with the City of Philadelphia, has been executing a World Heritage City initiative that capitalizes on the city’s diverse historical and cultural assets. John Smith, Board Chair of the Association, often says, “Our World Heritage City should be a city of the world’s heritages.” “We see the opportunity to work with the various organizations in the Parkside community as a way to explore how we can bring that concept to life, and have enjoyed our many interactions with the community,” Smith shared.

The Executive Director of the Association, Zabeth Teelucksingh, has a fondness for the Parkside community and enjoys driving pass the Victorian-style homes during her weekly trips to the international market. Regarding the Association’s affiliation with the Arts Fest, Teelucksingh remarks, “Parkside through its numerous constituents epitomizes much of what is global in Philadelphia. We look forward to helping relay that story to the international community in the region and beyond.”

The Festival @ ParkWest Town Center has several partnerships of its own and each member is eager to make this year’s festival the town square of all town squares. On March 1, Executive Director of West Philadelphia Financial Services, Jim Burnett, convened the first planning meeting with attendees from various organizations in the community. Some attendees included representatives from The Goldenberg Group, Parkside Association, Global Leadership Academy, Discovery Charter School, and West Philadelphia Neighborhood Libraries.

The Festival @ ParkWest Town Center is the annual celebration of the joint venture between West Philadelphia Financial Services and The Goldenberg Group. This June marks the 10th anniversary of ParkWest Town Center’s grand opening and commemorates the active involvement of community members since its establishment. “We created this festival to thank our shoppers,” says Burnett. Before the installation of the Town Center, West Parkside was a food desert with little to no access to fresh foods.

When asked about the significance of the annual festival, Burnett points to, “resident ownership of their community.” Timothy Smith of The Goldenberg Group adds, “the festival is about generating greater community pride and is a celebration of the asset that this Center is to the community. This is the ethos of Goldengberg.” Smith says he enjoys working for a company that uses its assets to do meaningful work.

The two also discussed the social and educational impact of the festival. “It’s like a family reunion,” said Burnett with a childlike grin on his face. The festival provides an opportunity for community residents to reconnect and build new alliances. The diligent efforts of students are also recognized as carefully selected seniors from neighboring high schools receive scholarship awards on an annual basis. The festival is in short, “a groundswell of community pride,” offered Smith.

Burnett, Lindley, and their respective partners are highly anticipant of both festivals 10-year anniversary celebration. With the two festivals occurring the same day, they expect the events to draw a new and larger audience, promote Parkside’s historic and cultural heritage, and generate a deeper level of civic pride and engagement.